Saksi

Poetry by | November 12, 2017

Sa pagtikang nako sa ang-ang,
Bitbit ang mga libro
Sa akong tuong kamot
Nakita nako ang duha ka taong nagtingkagol
Ang isa naglingkod, nagdungo
Dapit sa ga kipat- kipat nga suga
Ang isa, mingtukod sa lamesa
Ang mga gasigang mata nga mingtutok
Sa iyang kaatbang.

Tamiaw na ang palibot
Alas onse na ang takna
Naghulat na ang palong-palong nga patyon
Apan kaning balaya saba sa kamingaw.

Misinghag ang lalaki
Singhag nga susama sa taong nasakitan
Midepensa sa mga tumo-tumo sa silingan

Tumo- tumo nga dugay rang gakadunggan
Sa iyang kaatbang
Tumo- tumo nga daghan na ang nakasaksi
Nga ang lalaki gakambyada sa lahing babaye

Mitindog and babaye
Mitalikod sa lalaki
Gikan sa akong pwesto nakita ko
Sa tuong bahin sa iyang mata
Nahulog ang mga kasakit.
Dali- dali niya kining gipahiran
Sa pagtuong buta ang saksi
Milingi ang babaye
Sa akong gitindogan
Naghilak nga mingisi siya og miingon
“Yan nangabit imong papa”


Ianna lives in Puerto in Cagayan de Oro City. She is in her 4th year as BS Education major in Capitol University.

Kuhol

Poetry by | November 12, 2017

wa lang mo kabalo
sa akoang kahimtang
buntag udto hapon

padayon sa pagkamang
ning kalibutan
akong gipas-an
higala palihog
ko sa pagtabang

wa lang mo kabalo
unsa akong mga kasakit
sa akong padahik
ilalum sa kainit
usahay akong kaubanan
maligsan, tamakan
kataw-an ug pasipad-an

wa lang mo kabalo
usa lang akong kalipay
sa akong paghinay-hinay
ning gidala-dala kong balay
bisan asa ko muadto
makanto man o baryo
ning akong kalipay
akong poreber
nga gamay’ng balay

“kuhol man ako
sa inyong paningin
hihinga din ako
katulad nyo rin”
daghan diay mi
dinhia sa daplin-daplin
naningkamot, nanginabuhi
sa ginagmay nagpabilin


Jovanie was born in La Union, San Isidro, Davao Oriental. He is BSEd English graduate in Davao Oriental State College of Science and Technology, Mati City and currently an English instructor from the said institution.

Lyres and Dolls

Poetry by | October 22, 2017

One long toot and two short toots
The mother blows the whistle
and the rest of the dolls move.
The drums are beaten
and the lyres begin to sound
left, right, left the leather skirts
swoosh, swoosh, swoosh
The dolls dance to the sound
of the lyre
They move smoothly at each
ting of the lyre
But as the lyre changes the
melody the mother commands
the dolls to a different groove
two long toots, and one short toot
the lyre demands their move
and the dolls follows its groove


Si Joyce Duhaylungsod ay nagtuturo ng Panitikan at Sining sa isang Senior High sa lungsod ng Dabaw.

Coffee Prince

Poetry by | October 15, 2017

My early memory of
My mother is her
Breasts smelling like
The ground coffee
Rich and dark like the earth’s

I remember sucking on to
Her for milk lazed with
The coffee smell of her skin
And in the morning hours thereafter
That earthly aroma fades

Only the clink-chank of my teaspoon
As I stir a fresh cup of brewed coffee
Brings me back into the days
When I sucked for milk
Lazed with the coffee memory of her.


May Mundiz is a senior high teacher and a part-time Arts appreciation professor in Surigao. She writes, paints, and acts.

New Axis

Poetry by | October 8, 2017

I.

You don’t even have to force
Your mouth to open
And talk to me
Your throat might look like
A narrow street now
With so many words
Like crazy drivers in the city
Who won’t give way for little cars—
Racing, bumping into each other
Scars against scars
On numb walls
That will never show their pain,
They all want to come out
And escape the bumpy tunnel you built
Inside you

“Please take care of yourself”
“I’m leaving” I say in disgrace

II.

She had erased her fingerprints
On the world your hands have molded together
But left her breaths with yours
In the roots so you could live
With enough air to breathe
When you miss her
When you look for her face
Behind the shadow of your bedside lampshade at midnight
When you want to kiss,
When you feel alone,
When you want to be loved, again
By the love (you thought) only she can give you

III.

Years after,
The woman you have loved
Who has waved you good bye
Has come back
She has a face of Regret,
And you’re frozen
With mouth closed
And eyes locked
Your throat might still look like
A narrow street now
With so many words (That you wish you could tell her)
Like crazy drivers in the city
Who won’t give way for little cars—
But you reminded your gates
Never to open for strangers
So you didn’t say any word
You didn’t speak

Your eyes could not almost recognize her
The sparklers in her eyes are gone
The color of cherry on her cheeks have faded
And you can even see
The alcohol running through the veins of her
Calm hands
She has become a stranger
But your heart,
It never forgets her
She was supposed to ask you
If you could let her burry
Her fingertips once more
On the word she left

But she knew
That yesterday has died
And the air you breathe isn’t anymore
Her breaths
And the world you built together
Is now revolving
Around another axis


Ellah is a fourth year BSE major in English student at Capitol University, Cagayan de Oro City. She loves the taste of cold coffee in Sunday mornings and enjoys the smell of old books.

Sa Jeep nga Akong Nasakyan

Poetry by | October 1, 2017

Sa jeep nga akong nasakyan
Gikan Claveria paingon Ecoland,
Karon hapon lang,
Ako ng natestingan,
Didto ko milingkod sa unahan
Kini nga lingkuranan,
Usa ka balaan.

Sa jeep nga akong nasakyan
Hinay ug kusog ang dagan,
Ang break ni angkol,
Isa lang ka tadyakan
Pero kani nga jeep
Usa lang akong namatikdan
Ang maulahi ug sakay
Sa tumoy iyang paingnan.

Sa jeep nga akong nasakyan
Ang maulahi ddto sa unahan,
Pasahero musakay ug una
Taas-taas iyang adtuan,
Usahay hasul
Kay daghan masaghidan
Basta musakay ani nga jeep
Mao ni ang kamatuoran.

Sa jeep nga akong nasakyan,
Mao ni ang kamatuoran,
Tama jud diay
Ang giingon sa mga katigulangan
Ang bibliya gaingon
Usa ni ka balaan,
Ning akong gilingkuran
Mao ang kaluwasan.

Sa jeep nga akong nasakyan
Dinhi sa dakbayan
Kung naa ka sa unahan
Daghan kag suklianan,
Mahimo kang kundoktor
Ug piso-piso lang
Mahimo kang agianan
Sa kwarta
Ug sa kadiyot
Makwartahan.
Sa jeep nga akong nasakyan
Ang naglingkod
Sa unahan dunay
Gikahasulan
Sa mga pamalihog
Sa mga plete sa kadaghanan
Sa mga pasaherong mga buotan,
Usahay intawon, munaog
Way plete ug mudagan.

Kini akong nasinati
Sa jeep nga akong nasakyan
Gikan ug Claveria
paingon sa Ecoland
maayu ra pud ning
akong jeep nga nasakyan
iya kong gihatud sa akong adtuan.

Salamat sa drayber sa
Akong jeep nga nasakyan
Sa mga pasahero nga
wa nako mailhan
sa ilang dagway,
dunay pobre’g adunahan
diri lang ko kol,
lugar lang
amping sa imong padagan.


Jovanie Garay is a graduate of BSED Major in English from Davao Oriental State College of Science and Technology, in Mati, Davao Oriental. He is currently teaching English subjects in the same institution.

Buoyancy

Poetry by | October 1, 2017

Love starts
as a drop
of water.
It stays still
until it gathers
more of itself
to flow, to gush,
to become a force
that no dam can contain.

You are a body
of water.
Love will claim
every inch of you, too.
It is pointless to resist its rapids.

(Even time stood witness
on how the tallest of mountains
have lowered their bodies
before the crashing waves of
untamable oceans.)

Love submerges,
drowns us deep,
but it is the same thing
that keeps us
afloat.


Koko is a BSED-English graduate Ateneo de Davao University. He teaches in a public school in Davao City.

Adieu

Poetry by | October 1, 2017

‘Adieu’

I write your name
On a piece of paper—
I fold the sheet into halves
and then into another halves,
I pull some edges,
Clip some portions between portions
And there, on my palm lays a paper ship.

Under my blank-heavy blanket,
On the surface of my bed
Still, I carefully place it
Thinking that if I wouldn’t be careful
I might tear or crumple fragments of it.
And still, I wouldn’t like that to happen.
I let out my blues,
Let the torments pull it away—
I blink,
It sails.

I just stare at the paper ship
Until it’s away—
Gone from my sight.
I inhale,
Close my eyes and listen
To the sound of raindrops
Heftily falling,
Then I hear little cracks,
Little sound of breakings—

That is how I let go.


Ellah Ejem is a fourth year Bachelor of Secondary Education major in English student at Capitol University.